Artist Portfolio

Andra Samelson

Artist Biography

Andra Samelson is originally from Denver, Colorado and currently lives and works in both New York City and Delhi, NY. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Sarah Lawrence College.

Her work has been exhibited extensively in galleries and museums throughout the United States and Europe. Her public artwork, Heaven on Earth, commissioned by New Jersey Transit, is permanently installed at the Second Street Station in Hoboken, New Jersey and her stained glass window, commissioned by the Loyola University Museum of Art in Chicago, is permanently on view in their lobby.

Samelson has been an artist-in-residence at the Stone Quarry Hill Art Park in Cazenovia, NY and a visiting artist at the University of Virginia and the ceramics factory, Grazia Majoliche Artistiche, in Deruta, Italy. She is a recipient of Fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Corporation of Yaddo and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her work has been reproduced and reviewed in the New York Times, Art Forum, New York Arts, New American Painting and elsewhere, and is represented in several private and public collections including Chase Manhattan Bank, Dow Jones, the Library of Congress and the Rubin Museum of Art.

Artist STATEMENT

Statement


I am a multi-media artist and my work explores the relationship of microcosm and macrocosm with imagery often associated with molecular and galactic systems.

I frequently use the circle in my work, a symbol of infinity, without beginning or end, referencing both metaphysical concepts and circular forms in nature from the microcosm of the cell to the macrocosm of the starry universe.

In my recent paintings I am engaged in bringing the instinctive, immediate, and improvisational qualities of drawing to the process of painting. With various tools I draw into my paint, spontaneously creating a layered, linear matrix. The biomorphic forms that emerge show the traces of their evolution.

I am drawn to asymmetries and irregularities that produce what is surprising and idiosyncratic. I have frequently used the grid in my work to showcase the dialog between multiple, related images, exploring both the discord and harmony created by color.