Curated Shows

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Portraits

“Portraits”, curated by Ann Landi, is an online show of six NY Artist Circle members. Audrey Frank Anastasi, Margaret Zox Brown, Fran Beallor, Sue Burickson, Norma Greenwood, & Barbara Griffiths are artists who pursue more traditional forms of portraiture. They introduce subtle individual interpretations but their aims are primarily realist, and their time-honored medium is oil on canvas or board.

 


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The Lyrical

The art of these half-dozen women cannot be relegated entirely either to abstraction or figuration, which means that while their paintings do lean in one direction or another—Bender toward complete figuration, and Hobson toward pure abstraction, for example–the effects of their efforts cannot be determined as completely singular in one kind of art or another. Today, painting is most effective when it incorporates, eclectically, styles—we find art that exists between mediums is made stronger by differing combinations of expression. The six artists I have chosen reflect our current penchant for a work that exists between visual languages, just as, more generally speaking, much good art now rides between differing cultural influences.

 


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Abstract Realism: The Reality of Art

Curated by David Masello: A NY Artist’s Circle online exhibit embracing “abstract realism,” the notion being that an artist depicts something that is decidedly realistic while simultaneously embracing abstractin to articulate the object or figure or narrative. Featuring artists, JANET CULBERTSON, BARBARA LUBLINER, HELENE MUKHTAR, SUSAN BEALLOR SNYDER & APRIL VOLLMER

 


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Atmospheric Perspective

A Contemporary Approach to a Traditional Technique NY Artists Circle curated by Christina Massey @ Chashama 485 Madison Ave New York City, NY 10022 reception: Friday December 21, 2018 6-8 pm On View Dec 21- Jan 19th 2019. Atmospheric or aerial perspective refers to the traditional painting technique of creating an illusion of depth or distance by making objects appear less detailed and typically bluer than nearer objects, traditionally utilized in creating realistic landscapes. It is described as the air and all the particles in it, from dust to pollution that lingers between the eye of the viewer to the distant object that is the subject.

 


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Stillness

Sometimes in life we seek excitement, but sometimes we seek stillness. And what exactly is stillness? We can find stillness in nature as in a landscape, or in a selection of nature that is brought indoors as in a flower arrangement. Or we can also find stillness in abstraction. Each of the twenty artists in this exhibition approaches the notion of stillness in their own individual manner. Three distinct categories emerge: landscape, still-life, and abstraction. Interestingly, absent in almost all cases is the presence of a figure.

 


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Opposites Attract: Commonalities Appear

We seek the thing that connects one object to the next. Our objects are like our friends and lovers with which we share opinions and interests. We are united in moments where we overlap and find solace in our commonalities. Peggi Pugh, Kit Callahan, Susan Beallor-Snyder, Karen Fitzgerald, Susan Knight, Anne Finkelstein, and Francine Perlman maintain discrete studio practices, none of them working with the same intentionality nor the same material or process. Yet, as we keep looking at their work we begin to see moments of overlap. A curve here, a repetition there reveals itself, and slowly we link one aspect or part to the next.

 


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Lines

We all draw lines all the time! We draw a line to connect one thing to another. We draw a line when we have reached a limit, or to create a limit, or simply to discern this from that. We draw a line between right and wrong, here and there. We hold the line and warn our adversaries not to cross the line. A line can describe or define an object or a space. And a line can tie things together. It is quite remarkable how much a simple line can achieve. How does something that has no substance do so much? Through the varied and facile ways Audrey Stone, Yvette Cohen, Shira Toren, and Diane Englander employ a line we see how a line can define, unite, and blur the boundary between painting and sculpture.

 


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On Growth and Form

Art and nature have always gone hand in hand. It is hard to think of one without the other. In recognition of this, our first exhibition commences on the conclusion of the one-hundredth anniversary of the Scottish mathematical biologist and classicist, Sir D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s On Growth and Form. “… if we consider the wonders of a limestone cavern which a filtering stream has filled with stalactites, we soon perceive that … we have begun with an initial system of very slight complexity, whose structure in no way foreshadowed the result, and whose comparatively simple intrinsic forces only play their part by complex interaction with the equally simple forces of the surrounding medium.”