Artist Portfolio

Jenna Lash

Albums

Artist Biography

Jenna Lash is a Neo-pointillist cultural currency artist—a visual artist who comments on cultural identity by reinterpreting the images of domestic and international currency. By enhancing the iconography of money to inspire her art, Lash uses the familiar to inform the abstract.


Many of her large paintings range from 48" by 48," to 48" by 160," and convey their message through a painstaking application of built-up dotted color, as did Georges Seurat, and Paul Signac. Seeking to create beauty and light, Lash paints with oil or acrylic paint on canvas to build a subtle-colored luminous world and breathe rhythmic and patterned mindfulness into her work.


Lash has had fourteen solo shows in New York, and the New York metropolitan area during the last fifteen years, and participated in more than thirty juried exhibitions. Her art is held by collectors worldwide, including law and accounting firms, banks, corporations, foreign exchange and trading firms, and patrons of the arts. She holds a Master’s of Arts Degree from New York University, a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Connecticut at Storrs, and studied at the American Academy of Rome and SUNY Purchase College.


Lash is a member of the Numismatic Society, and currently resides in downtown Manhattan, and works in her Chelsea, New York studio.


Artist STATEMENT

What value, money?

Money is a framework for my exploration of value and values: of the personal versus the public; of the conflicting perspectives between men and women; of the cultural differences between generations; and of the harmony between (or conflict with) individuals in relation to a global society.

Over the years, I have pondered many questions about this highly charged symbol, and what it represents with respect to identity--both of the self, and of one's larger society. How do we reflect our own worth, and our worth as a society, through currency? Should it still matter that individual countries each have their own currency, or would it be better to have a borderless world, and a unified currency? (Will it unite us, or ultimately destroy us?) What is money's position vis-a-vis individualism, diversity, identity, unity? What, ultimately, will be gained, and what lost?

I believe that these questions continue to be relevant today, as information, relationships, and, ultimately, currency--become ever more connected. As an artist, I want to encourage my viewers to consider how their money, and what they choose to spend on (or forego) goes hand in hand with the worth assigned to individuals, things, societies and countries.

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